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Frazier, Frank, (The BeBop Singer)

$225.00

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Frazier, Frank, (The BeBop Singer)
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"The BeBop Singer" by Frank Frazier

5 x 9" pastel on paper, unframed, 2002

Frank Frazier began his work as a fine artist early, at the age of seven. He was creating paintings in his family's Harlem, New York City home. This sculptor, painter, and collagist cites the Creator as his biggest influence. "The Creator inspires me. He puts whatever I need in me. He also admits that he "loves black women and likes to use them in his art." Frazier also credits Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, and Elizabeth Cattlett as his biggest artistic inspirations. Speaking on how the Diaspora influences his art, Frank muses, "I go to Senegal, West Africa a lot. Many of my collages are influenced from there." As far as the media he works with, the sky is the limit. "I paint with oils, watercolors, and charcoal, anything that's available," says Frazier.   Frazier's exhibits include shows at the King Center exhibit in Columbus, Ohio, the Schomberg Center in New York, National Civil Rights Museum in Tennessee and the Library of Congress in DC, among others. 

Now living in Texas, Frazier is working on a series of paintings on the civil rights movement. He recently completed a road trip to various Southern cities that were pivotal to the struggle for equal rights; Jackson, Mississippi to Birmingham, Alabama, to Selma, to Tuskegee. This statesmen of art was "never motivated by money" when producing his art; the love of black history and culture and creation are his driving force.